All posts in Posture

We surveyed physicians who refer to Nick Rinard Physical Therapy.

 

 When asked “WHAT IS IT ABOUT OUR CLINIC THAT MADE YOU CONFIDENT ABOUT SENDING US YOUR PATIENTS?” they replied……

  • “You get great results.”
  • “Good feedback in timely fashion.”
  • “Customer Service – great!”
  • “Positive Results!”
  • “It works for many patients, quickly – minimal visits.”
  • “It empowers the patient life-long.”
  • “If it does not work you’ll know within 2 visits.”
  • “Your group is kind, responsive, courteous.”
  • “Recommendation of other providers.”
  • “Courtesy shown to patients.”
  • “Results!”
  • “Excellent understanding and implementation of the McKenzie protocol.”
  • “Thorough assessment and plan.”
  • “Good results.”
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Mck and Nick Rinard PT observes patterns

https://buff.ly/2BmAFfz “Conclusions: Observed patterns of cervical radiculopathy only followed the standard pattern in…

Posted by McKenzie Institute International on Saturday, August 18, 2018

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How do your knees affect your stride? By Nick Rinard MPT, Cert MDT

Technically speaking your knees (the joint parts) do not affect stride since running is a “mid-range” motion.  Walking, on the other hand, does involve end range extension, so limited extension could have an effect – but not in running.  Pain in the knee is likely to affect your ability to tolerate a running stride, and your body will find ways to avoid pain – thus affecting your stride in varying ways.  There is no typical way this happens, so if you have knee pain, you need to have a good mechanical examination to find out how to best treat or manage it.

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Treating Low Back Pain with Physical Therapy First

 

Low back pain is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. A recent study found that “Out of 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, LBP ranked highest in terms of disability (YLDs), and sixth in terms of overall burden.” With a large range of different types of back pain it can be extremely frustrating finding relief from this type of pain.

Luckily there has been a large effort to find the best approach to dealing with low back pain. A 2018 study comparing healthcare costs for patients with a diagnosis of low back pain between the ages of 18 and 64. Interventions studied included differences in opioid prescription, health care utilization, and timing of PT intervention. This study found that patients who saw a PT at first had a lower utilization of high‐cost medical services (MRI, surgical intervention, emergency room visits) as well as lower opioid use.

Another study looked at the differences in long term outcomes in patients with spinal stenosis given PT or surgery. The results of this study after 2 years found that patients “did not differ significantly between patients who had undergone surgery and those who avoided surgery.” This shows that physical therapy alone is a much safer, cheaper, and equally effective choice.

Understanding your back pain and using your own body to fix itself has proven to be the least expensive and best outcome tool when dealing with low back pain. Therefore be your own advocate when dealing with new or recurring back pain and try PT first!

 

Frogner, B. K., Harwood, K., Andrilla, C. H. A., Schwartz, M., & Pines, J. M. (2018). Physical Therapy as the First Point of Care to Treat Low Back Pain: An Instrumental Variables Approach to Estimate Impact on Opioid Prescription, Health Care Utilization, and Costs. Health services research.

Hoy, D., March, L., Brooks, P., Blyth, F., Woolf, A., Bain, C., & Murray, C. (2014). The global burden of low back pain: estimates from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study. Annals of the rheumatic diseases73(6), 968-974.

Minetama, M., Kawakami, M., Nakagawa, M., Ishimoto, Y., Nagata, K., Fukui, D., & Sakon, N. (2018). A comparative study of 2-year follow-up outcomes in lumbar spinal stenosis patients treated with physical therapy alone and those with surgical intervention after less successful physical therapy. Journal of Orthopedic Science23(3), 470-476.

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Centralization of the Cervical Spine Mck Institute

https://buff.ly/2JJhRX3 And then in 2012, along came this systematic review: "Twenty-one of 23 studies supported the…

Posted by McKenzie Institute International on Saturday, July 21, 2018

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What are you doing to improve yourself in 2018?

‘Tis the season for making resolutions, focusing on self-improvement, and charting the course for the year ahead.  What are you doing to improve yourself in 2018?  One small step that can make a tremendous impact in many areas of your life is simply to establish good self-accountability.  How credible are you?  Many of us are loyal to commitments we make to our friends, family, and coworkers but we may routinely neglect to fulfill our promises to ourselves.  When was the last time you put off a work out, failed to follow through with a diet goal, or simply lost momentum with a good training program?

Creating the discipline of good habits is beneficial to all of us!  Whether you are looking to reboot your home exercise routine or seeking to redeem your diet after an avalanche of holiday feasts – consistency is the key.  Daily diligence defines the difference between crashing through a fad and building a foundation of good habits that can improve your life.  In some areas of life, this need for consistency is obvious, for example: brushing your teeth.  If you wish to have fresh breath for your date on Friday night, is brushing your teeth just once on Tuesday going to cut it?  Nope!  Good oral hygiene requires that twice a day commitment every day of the week.  Other areas of our health will benefit from applying this daily discipline as well.

So, here are 5 easy ways to help build credibility with yourself and to insure you follow through with all of those good intensions.

  • Make an appointment with yourself – Schedule time on your calendar each day, even if it is just 20 minutes, to do your home exercise program. Honor this time the same way you would honor any other medical appointment.
  • Reward yourself when you follow through – Improving your health is its own reward, but you may need other tangible incentives to keep you motivated on your course. Make a barter system with yourself – “For every 10 minutes I spend on this treadmill, I will get 10 minutes of guilt-free Netflix ve
  • Get friends and family onboard – One of my patients found the best way to correct his posture was to recruit his children, “It’s open season, kids – anytime you can catch me slouching, call me on it and I will give you a dollar.”
  • Keep it visible – Put those running shoes in a high visibility area of your home so that you have a visual reminder to gear up and get outside for a jog. Are you using a theraband for your exercise routine? Don’t hide it – hang it in plain sight so that you are prompted to put it to good use!
  • Teach what you’ve learned – If you have mastered a new exercise or healthy recipe, share it! Pay it forward and reap the benefit of better understanding through teaching. You know you have truly mastered a technique when you can teach it effectively to someone else.

So let me know – what do you do to encourage yourself to follow through with your commitments to yourself?  Have you tried any of these suggestions before?  Do you have new ideas you’d like to share with us? Let’s support each other in making 2018 a year of abundant good health!

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The Power of Posture by Margo Burette

What do a toy poodle and the human head have in common? They both share an average weight of 10-12 pounds. Your spine has three natural shock-absorbing curves which attenuate the stress of bearing that load above your shoulders while you move through your day. With good posture and frequent position changes, most of us can bear that weight without difficulty.

However, the moment you drop your chin to read the latest blog update on your cell phone the balance changes completely. When your head inclines forward 60 degrees the force your neck is bearing is equivalent to exchanging that toy poodle for a Labrador retriever – 60 pounds of force (Hansraj, 2014)! Consider that the average person sustains this position for 2-4 hours a day while using their smart phone and the load quickly becomes overwhelming. This chronic fatigue to the muscles and structure of the neck can lead to debilitating injury.

Your neck will thank you for contacting Nick Rinard Physical Therapy to address your posture.

Let us help you get that heavy Labrador off your shoulders!

Hansraj, KK. “Assessment of stresses in the cervical spine caused by posture and position of the head.” Surgical Technology International. 2014, November; 25:277-9

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The Power of Posture

ToyPoodle wearing Sunglasses Outdoor

What do a toy poodle and the human head have in common? They both share an average weight of 10-12 pounds. Your spine has three natural shock-absorbing curves which attenuate the stress of bearing that load above your shoulders while you move through your day. With good posture and frequent position changes, most of us can bear that weight without difficulty.

However, the moment you drop your chin to read the latest blog update on your cell phone the balance changes completely. When your head inclines forward 60 degrees the force your neck is bearing is equivalent to exchanging that toy poodle for a Labrador retriever – 60 pounds of force (Hansraj, 2014)! Consider that the average person sustains this position for 2-4 hours a day while using their smart phone and the load quickly becomes overwhelming. This chronic fatigue to the muscles and structure of the neck can lead to debilitating injury.

Your neck will thank you for contacting Nick Rinard Physical Therapy to address your posture.

Let us help you get that heavy Labrador off your shoulders!

Hansraj, KK. “Assessment of stresses in the cervical spine caused by posture and position of the head.” Surgical Technology International. 2014, November; 25:277-9

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